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Blood Tests being Underutilized in Diagnosing Celiac Disease

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Celiac disease, one of the most common autoimmune diseases in the world today, often goes undiagnosed due to asymptomatic patients and many nonspecific symptoms. To diagnose a patient with celiac disease, a positive intestinal biopsy is typically necessary. But when physicians need to decide on whether or not to order a biopsy, they have many […]

Gluten Alternatives: Effects of Eating Quinoa in Celiac Patients

Alternatives to gluten are absolutely vital to those diagnosed with celiac disease as the only treatment available currently is a life-long, strict gluten-free diet. Many doctors and nutritionists recommend foods like amaranth, millet, buckwheat, and quinoa as substitutes for wheat and other grains toxic for celiac patients; however, there have been recent laboratory tests that […]

Celiac Disease Risk Linked to Absence of Bacteria in the Gut

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A recent study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology by several scientists including Dr. Peter H. R. Green, the founder of the Columbia University Celiac Disease Center and a Medical Advisory Board member for the Celiac Disease Foundation, has found a link between a particular bacterial strain typically found in the human gut and […]

Gluten and Infant Feeding Pattern’s Possible Effect on Prevalence of Celiac Disease

Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease associated with small intestinal damage and villous atrophy. It occurs in genetically susceptible people of all ages and can involve a variety of symptoms and can also be asymptomatic. Not every genetically susceptible person gets CD however, most likely signifying that environmental factors influence the disease. Infant feeding […]

Usefulness of Symptoms as a Diagnostic Tool for Celiac Disease

Celiac disease (CD) is the most common genetically-induced food intolerance and is thought to be present in about 1% of the world’s population. Many cases of CD go undiagnosed until adulthood but mass screening for CD for the entire population is controversial. Instead of serological (blood serum) screening for CD markers as a first step, a questionnaire could be an alternative to identifying those at risk for CD. A recent study in Sweden by Rosen et al. examined strategies for screening children for CD. Published online by Pediatrics on January 13, the study had 12-year-old children and their parents complete questionnaires about symptoms of CD and family history.

Early Feeding and Risk of Celiac Disease in a Prospective Birth Cohort

OBJECTIVES: Timing of gluten introduction has been associated with the risk of celiac disease (CD) in children, but the optimal time window is unknown. We aimed to study the effect of age of gluten introduction on the risk of CD, adjusting for continued breastfeeding. METHODS: In The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, a prospective […]